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Adding Skin to Muscle and Bone by whimsi Adding Skin to Muscle and Bone by whimsi
[link] - Part 1 : Identifying Bone Structure That Forms the Framework of the Body
[link] - Part 2 : Identifying the Muscles That Shape the Body
[link] - Part 3 : Using What You Know About Bone and Muscle Structure to Shape Realistic Skin

:bulletred: The image of this tutorial has been removed. I am working on an updated version of all of these images. Stay tuned ;D :bulletred:

Once you have a basic understanding of the structure and shape of the skeletal and muscular systems, it’s a simple task to create believable skin on top of that. This small tutorial is Part 3. For the other two parts, please visit the links above.

The easiest way to mark where bones are is to use lines for bones and dots or circles for joints. It is not necessary to draw each and every bone perfectly, most of them won’t be seen in the final piece. What is important is to get the relative size and position correct.

It’s very easy to quickly sketch the skeleton of a figure this way. Once you have that done, you can sketch the basic shapes of prominent muscles in the body.

This method yields a better and more realistic finished piece than simply sketching base shapes for chunks of the body, i.e. an oval for a head, cylinders for portions or arms, legs and rectangles or other polygons for the torso, hands or feet. It may not seem like it should make a difference, but some subtle presence of the prominent muscles in a body make the difference between “Sorta realistic” and “Wow!”

Once those basic muscle shapes are sketched, outline the basic shape of the body, taking care to keep in mind the muscles below.

In this image, you can see simple shading was used to define shadows and highlights due to the shape of the muscles. Crosshatching, stippling and other methods of shading may obviously be substituted for coloring. Mind the position and shape of the muscles and shade appropriately.
:icongerardnicholas:
GerardNicholas Featured By Owner Aug 11, 2011  Hobbyist Traditional Artist
Awesome :)
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